National Park Service
US Department of the Interior
National Park Service
Interpretive Development Program

Leading People

Definition

Encourages creative tension and differences of opinions through the development of a culture of inclusiveness, respect and civility.  Anticipates and takes steps to prevent potential situations that could result in unpleasant and counter productive confrontations.  Manages and resolves conflicts and disagreements in a constructive manner.

Importance

Failure to recognize, resolve and/or manage disagreements that have the potential to grow into confrontations undermines the culture and performance of a team or organization. It is critical to learn from disagreements by understanding and analyzing the source of the dispute.  It is also important to work strategically to establish organizational cultures and procedures that value the basic rules of civility and mitigate against disagreements while encouraging the positive dimensions of divergent thinking. Introducing creative conflict to situations also has the ability to bring about innovation and more robust results to problem solving.

How do Chiefs of Interpretation demonstrate this competency?

  • Demonstrates self understanding, emotional control and empathy when dealing with conflict.
  • Demonstrates skills in active listening and encourages open discussion and debate.
  • Assists others to seek common ground and to identify the cause of the problem.
  • Gives voice to the conflict and uses it in a positive way to foster a culture of inclusion.
  • Demonstrates a personal knowledge of conflict management practices and resources and effectively utilizes that knowledge and skill where appropriate.
  • Analyzes and identifies personal, structural and/or other sources of potential conflict within the team or organization and develops a proactive plan that anticipates change or action.
  • Inspires confidence and engenders trust in all parties involved
  • Coaches, counsels and motivates employees toward greater mutual respect and understanding.

 

 

Element

Knowledge, Skill, Ability, or Behavior

Outcome

Understands Emotional Intelligence as it relates to Self Understanding, Emotional Control, Understanding Others and Empathy.

  • Knowledge of own preference styles, cultural perspectives and values, and how they differ from others.
  • Knowledge of strategies to and ability to exercise emotional control.
  • Knowledge of strategies for and ability to practice active listening, understanding of self and others, and empathy

 

  • Is perceived by others as level-headed and one who maintains composure in stressful situations.
  • Knows strengths and areas to improve – can/will call in others when a stronger skill set/behavior type is needed.
  • Has an understanding of how perceived by others and the dynamics that he or she creates.
  • Has tough discussion at all levels (peer, supv., subordinates, stakeholders) without strong emotive responses and to remain effective.
  • Ability to adapt ones style to match those interacting with to meet the groups needs.
  • Creates an organizational environment that works – embodies fairness.
  • Employers/constituents/stakeholders/ co-workers/peers feel that the environment includes them and they can reach potential.

Ability to analyze personal, structural and other sources of conflict within the team or organization and develop a plan to use that conflict opportunity in a constructive manner

  • Knowledge of group and organization dynamics as well as strategies, techniques and resources that utilize conflict within them.
  • Anticipate future changes and conflict where possible and take action.
  • Knowledge of position and interests of parties involved in conflict.
  • Ability to reconcile or work within the conflicts between external partners and organizations to effectively advance the needs of different interests, positions, missions, and visions.
  • Ability to work within the realm where conflict may always exist.
  • Proactively prevent unconstructive/ unnecessary conflict from happening.
  • Brings about appropriate resolution of conflict (sometimes agreeing to disagree).
  • Finds where commonalities are
  • Results in a shared support of management actions.
  • A diversity of groups support managerial actions that are aligned with park mission.
  • Management practices are improved.

Know the value of and be able to develop a culture of inclusiveness, respect and civility that values and respects different ideas and preferences

  • Seeks out invisible barriers:  what about our differences of backgrounds may hold individuals back from working together.
  • Holds self and others accountable for the maintenance of an organizational culture whose practices embody fairness, inclusiveness, respect and civility.
  • Ability to show respect and civility through zero tolerance of discrimination and ground rules to support presentation of multiple points of view.

 

 

  • Members of team feel included, respected, valued, and that they have a voice.
  • Comfortable with creative conflict and has the ability to recognize a homogenous group and when you may need varied voice to help with a more robust outcome.
  • Has power of multiple points of view and establishing relevance at our sites by engaging diverse views and inviting in conflicting values, beliefs, and backgrounds.
  • Can effectively referee between management team/superintendent/stakeholder groups/etc.
  • Is a resource for knowledge about stakeholder groups, how they operate, what their values/missions are and apply this information to conflict resolution.
  • Communicates proactively to alert superintendent and other managers about media messages/outside stories that may generate conflict.

Knowledge of and ability to use state-of-the-art conflict management practices  and effectively use of in-house resources to manage conflict

 

  • Demonstrates confidence and decisiveness by tackling challenging conflict early, so as to diffuse a potentially volatile situation as soon as possible.
  • Ability to help others find common ground and towards resolution (negotiation skill).
  • Demonstrates skill at giving voice to conflict and uses it in a positive way to foster a culture of inclusion.
  • Demonstrates oral and written communication and non-verbal skills to influence behaviors or perceptions constructively.
  • Ability to deflect, navigate through, and engage conflict on an ongoing basis, internally and externally.
  • Understanding of CORE, EAP, and EEO and ability to work with these systems to resolve conflict at the lowest level possible.
  • Has a variety of tools in his/her toolbox to be able to use appropriate technique taking into consideration timelines/team/etc.
  • Has a sense of when being manipulated and can respond/react appropriately.
  • Calls in help when needed.
  • Works with HR staff and guide own staff on conflict management practices.
  • Evaluates level of conflict and determine what outcome is desired and works with staff to navigate to the right resources.

Understand and demonstrate knowledge of the role that constructive conflict can play in achieving innovative and robust results

  • Ability to engage creative conflict that leads to better ideas, systems, processes and relationships (poke the bear).
  • Demonstrates a comfort level with conflict.

 

 

  • Doesn’t shut down conflict too soon, but knows the tipping point where it becomes less constructive.
  • Engages with conflict as needed to move staff and processes to a higher level.

Definition

Inspires, motivates and guides others through the collaborative process toward achieving identified goals.  Delegates and defines decision-making authority and responsibility within the team and sustains the collaborative process through good team and performance management.  Encourages and facilitates cooperation within the organization and with stakeholders, fostering commitment, team spirit, pride and trust. 

Importance

Team-based approaches to work (formal and informal groups, work groups, committees, etc.) can be powerfully effective as building blocks for organizational performance. A high-performing team that emphasizes collaboratively working together to achieve common goals develops synergy, thereby increasing its effectiveness as a force for productivity, quality and cost reduction. Teams have greater total resources, greater diversity of resources, and diversity of thought (values, backgrounds, and beliefs) contributing to improved problem solving and to higher productivity.  Collaboration among group members helps to “socialize” new members, facilitate organizational performance, build leadership skills, and inspire innovation while providing benefits for their members. Teams help their members learn about the Agency and themselves as they acquire new skills and performance strategies, and can also serve important personal needs for affiliation and esteem.

How do Chiefs of Interpretation demonstrate this competency?

  • Builds the problem solving ability of the team members and the team itself through coaching, mentoring and training.
  • Communicates the organization’s mission and goals with insight and enthusiasm.
  • Facilitates internal group dynamics and ensures that all voices are heard and respected.
  • Establishes and enforces standards of behavior which promote inclusion and participation.
  • Provide guidance and direction within the group to clarify members’ roles and responsibilities while defining parameters of authority and available resources.
  • Helps group to establish appropriate metrics and objective criteria to accomplish assigned task and ensures that work is accomplished within established timetables.
  • Instills a sense of opportunity and possibility in accomplishment of team goals.
  • Collaborates with relevant groups to gain information about external conditions that might impact the work of the team; and change course when needed.
  • Models acceptable team behavior.
  • Communicates and promotes successful team efforts throughout the organization.

 

 

Elements of the Competency, KSABs, and Outcomes

 

Element

Knowledge, Skill, Ability, or Behavior

Outcome

Understands Emotional Intelligence as it relates to Self Understanding, Emotional Control, Understanding Others and Empathy.

  • Knowledge of own preference styles, cultural perspectives and values, and how they differ from others.
  • Knowledge of strategies to and ability to exercise emotional control.
  • Knowledge of strategies for and ability to practice active listening, understanding of self and others, and empathy

 

  • Is perceived by others as level-headed and one who maintains composure in stressful situations.
  • Knows strengths and areas to improve – can/will call in others when a stronger skill set/behavior type is needed.
  • Has an understanding of how perceived by others and the dynamics that he or she creates.
  • Has tough discussion at all levels (peer, supv., subordinates, stakeholders) without strong emotive responses and to remain effective.
  • Ability to adapt ones style to match those interacting with to meet the groups needs.
  • Creates an organizational environment that works – embodies fairness.
  • Employers/constituents/stakeholders/ co-workers/peers feel that the environment includes them and they can reach potential.

Ability to analyze personal, structural and other sources of conflict within the team or organization and develop a plan to use that conflict opportunity in a constructive manner

  • Knowledge of group and organization dynamics as well as strategies, techniques and resources that utilize conflict within them.
  • Anticipate future changes and conflict where possible and take action.
  • Knowledge of position and interests of parties involved in conflict.
  • Ability to reconcile or work within the conflicts between external partners and organizations to effectively advance the needs of different interests, positions, missions, and visions.
  • Ability to work within the realm where conflict may always exist.
  • Proactively prevent unconstructive/ unnecessary conflict from happening.
  • Brings about appropriate resolution of conflict (sometimes agreeing to disagree).
  • Finds where commonalities are
  • Results in a shared support of management actions.
  • A diversity of groups support managerial actions that are aligned with park mission.
  • Management practices are improved.

Know the value of and be able to develop a culture of inclusiveness, respect and civility that values and respects different ideas and preferences

  • Seeks out invisible barriers:  what about our differences of backgrounds may hold individuals back from working together.
  • Holds self and others accountable for the maintenance of an organizational culture whose practices embody fairness, inclusiveness, respect and civility.
  • Ability to show respect and civility through zero tolerance of discrimination and ground rules to support presentation of multiple points of view.

 

 

  • Members of team feel included, respected, valued, and that they have a voice.
  • Comfortable with creative conflict and has the ability to recognize a homogenous group and when you may need varied voice to help with a more robust outcome.
  • Has power of multiple points of view and establishing relevance at our sites by engaging diverse views and inviting in conflicting values, beliefs, and backgrounds.
  • Can effectively referee between management team/superintendent/stakeholder groups/etc.
  • Is a resource for knowledge about stakeholder groups, how they operate, what their values/missions are and apply this information to conflict resolution.
  • Communicates proactively to alert superintendent and other managers about media messages/outside stories that may generate conflict.

Knowledge of and ability to use state-of-the-art conflict management practices  and effectively use of in-house resources to manage conflict

 

  • Demonstrates confidence and decisiveness by tackling challenging conflict early, so as to diffuse a potentially volatile situation as soon as possible.
  • Ability to help others find common ground and towards resolution (negotiation skill).
  • Demonstrates skill at giving voice to conflict and uses it in a positive way to foster a culture of inclusion.
  • Demonstrates oral and written communication and non-verbal skills to influence behaviors or perceptions constructively.
  • Ability to deflect, navigate through, and engage conflict on an ongoing basis, internally and externally.
  • Understanding of CORE, EAP, and EEO and ability to work with these systems to resolve conflict at the lowest level possible.
  • Has a variety of tools in his/her toolbox to be able to use appropriate technique taking into consideration timelines/team/etc.
  • Has a sense of when being manipulated and can respond/react appropriately.
  • Calls in help when needed.
  • Works with HR staff and guide own staff on conflict management practices.
  • Evaluates level of conflict and determine what outcome is desired and works with staff to navigate to the right resources.

Understand and demonstrate knowledge of the role that constructive conflict can play in achieving innovative and robust results

  • Ability to engage creative conflict that leads to better ideas, systems, processes and relationships (poke the bear).
  • Demonstrates a comfort level with conflict.

 

 

  • Doesn’t shut down conflict too soon, but knows the tipping point where it becomes less constructive.
  • Engages with conflict as needed to move staff and processes to a higher level.